Poetry

“Gravy Pills,” one other text, and five asemic vispo published in Otoliths 55

otoliths 55 cover

Just released, Otoliths #55, the Southern Autumn 2019 issue, is jam packed as usual with fine text, vispo and hybrid experiments from across the international literary avant garde. I’m pleased to be represented with two new texts, “Gravy Pills” and “Phantom Gold,” plus five new visual poems with asemic writing. You can view them here.

asemic vispo-otoliths 55

The texts continue experiments with AI language poems, this time using vocabulary drawn from the magical thinking of the average American. The vispo are a small selection from a kind of diary of a extraplanetary colony world.

gravy pills-otoliths 55

Halloween humor: Cthulhu Limericks

Cthulhu ad-sirens call

Looking for some Halloween humor? Cthulhu Limericks is available on Amazon! This collection of 70+ rhymed verses based on H.P. Lovecraft’s Cthulhu Mythos combines horror and humor in equal measure to demonstrate that man’s view of himself as the center of a known space-time continuum remains laughably out of scale with the reality that ancient forces control his world.

Print version available here; kindle version here.

Best of Net Nomination for “Ouija Leans In”

best of net 2019

I was pleasantly surprised to hear from Midnight Lane Boutique editor Johnny Longfellow yesterday, telling me he had nominated my poem “Ouija Leans In” for the Best of the Net Anthology 2019. He announced his nominations, which included pieces by Kimo Armitage and Joan Colby, on the journal’s website here.

Even more flattering was the thoughtful analysis he wrote of my work:

Despite its seemingly supernatural underpinnings, this poem speaks directly to the difficulties of not simply communicating with others, but of sometimes even finding the words to express a complete thought. Not simply a fine example of contemporary absurdism, this poem also illustrates the utility of using the so-called “pathetic fallacy” that many less daring writers would not even think to attempt. And, it does so with both sly humor and rich imagery.

Aside from making the piece sound smarter than it actually is, this note helped me understand how other people might read and understand one of my poems. It’s been over 30 years since I read nineteenth century art critic John Ruskin in grad school, so I had to google his term “pathetic fallacy” to find out it refers to the rather lazy poetic tendency to anthropomorphize inanimate objects, particularly in the work of Wordsworth, Keats and other Romantics. The sentimentality of a “chuckling brook” or a “jolly breeze” really rubbed Ruskin the wrong way. I wonder what he would have thought about using a Ouija board as a character in a poem?

Anyway, Johnny Longfellow published “Ouija Leans In,” along with two other poems featuring Ouija, in Midnight Lane Boutique on August 3, 2018. You can read them here.

best of net ouija

5 asemic vispo published in Utsanga

utsanga-5 asemic vispo

Utsanga just released it’s third quarterly issue for the year, jammed with great cutting edge poetry and discussions of poetic possibility from across the international avant garde. I’m pleased to be represented with some new work–five vispo images with asemic writing. This is part of a much larger series that I completed this summer.

Check it out here.

“A Bone and It’s Dog” published in Slipstream 39

Just received my copy of Slipstream #39 in the mail yesterday. This new issue is themed “Boneyards, Junkyards and Backyards”–80 pages of poetry in an outlaw mode. Lots of great stuff, judging by the brief time I’ve flipped through it. This is a print-only magazine, so copies can be purchased direct through the journal’s website.

I’m pleased to be represented here with one poem, “A Bone and It’s Dog.”

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“Silver Tree in the Black Castle” and three other poems published in Ygdrasil

silver tree ygdrasil

The August 2019 issue of online literary journal Ygdrasil was released on July 10. It includes four of my poems from the Civilization’s Lost series: “The Silver Tree in the Black Castle,” “Capital Ruins,” “Early Observatory,” and “Erasing the Temple.” This series examines lost civilizations from around the world to highlight the fragility of languages, cultures and nations in the wake of the current American regime. You can read the whole issue here.

ygdrasil Aug 2019

“This Changes Everything” and two other poems plus four vispo published in Otoliths

otoliths-54-this changes everything

 

Otoliths 54, the Southern Winter 2019 issue, was released today, encompassing another encyclopedic cross section of the international avant garde in textual and visual works. I’m very pleased to be included with four visual poems and three new text pieces: “This Changes Everything,” “See What’s All About,” and “What We See.” You can check them out here.

The vispo are part of a small series of “tape sample” works made by pulling images from a daily newspaper using cellophane tape. The texts are part of a series inspired by the Facebook AI units that created their own language using English words with new semantic and syntactical values.