3 vispo published in 3:AM Magazine

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Online literary journal 3:AM Magazine regularly published visual poetry of a specific aesthetic they call “poem brut,” referring to handmade pieces with an outsider feel. Today, three of my visual poems appeared in the magazine. You can check them all out here.

I called these pieces “tape samples” because I discovered them while “reading” newsprint sources using cellophane tape, collecting ink residue in a kind of analog sampling process. Maybe this evidence confirms the unfathomable world hidden behind the clutter of advertising and news reports with their nakedly cynical purposes. I’m always searching for these alternate spaces; I find them reassuring.

Since I made the series of pieces in the 90s, they have acquired a nice patina of age as the newspaper sticking to the tape turned brown. The backing paper was always that tan color.

One poem and five asemic works in Angry Old Man

AOM 6 coverOnline experimental lit journal Angry Old Man released Issue 6 today, with another great roster of visual, text and video work from across the spectrum of the international literary avant garde. I’m pleased to be represented by one text piece and five asemic calligraphy works. The text piece is part of a new series of experiments involving a very restricted vocabulary intended to mirror the kind of language invention of an AI transaction robot. View the text piece here, and the asemic calligraphy here.

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AOM 6 asemic

“Watching that Fire” published in Rat’s Ass Review

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The Summer 2019 issue of Rat’s Ass Review was released today. Lots of great work here in what would probably be called the “outlaw” vein, so I’m pleased that my poem “Watching that Fire” made the cut for this issue. You can read the full piece here. My piece is the third from the top, only cause it’s arranged alphabetically by author.

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Four asemic calligraphy poems published in Utsanga

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Utsanga is an online journal for experimental writing and theory, based in Italy. The journal’s nineteenth issue, the first of 2019, was released today (March 31) with a who’s who of contributors from the international avant lit scene, including Francesco Aprile, Tim Gaze, Mark Young, Rosaire Appel, John M. Bennett, and many others. Well worth checking out. I’m very pleased to have been included this time with a selection of four pieces of asemic calligraphy. You can check them out here.

Five asemic writing pieces published at The New Post-literate

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The New Post-literate: A Gallery of Asemic Writing is a weblog exploring “asemic writing in relation to post-literate culture.” Scan its entries to find a massive catalog of imaginary scripts and pseudo-writing from around the world. Ultimately, these are scripts or images that look like writing, but have no semantic content. For me, the pieces have the same mysterious pull of looking at lost languages like Linear B, Harappan characters, or Easter Island’s rongorongo script, or even deciphered ones like Ancient Egyptian or Mayan hieroglyphs.

Today, the NP-L published five of my asemic writing pieces, which I made using a brush and India ink back in November 2017. I’m calling them “poems” but they could be prose poems, short stories, or grocery lists. Ultimately, it’s a type of visual poetry. You can check out the pieces here.

Postcard project: Civilization’s Lost

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Here’s an experiment in poetry publishing that’s new to me. The idea was planted by fellow DC poet Buck Downs, who’s been regularly sending out postcard poems for years. At just three lines, the title piece from the Civilization’s Lost series–poems based around lost cities and civilizations to highlight the fragility of languages, cultures and nations–seemed perfect for this. I ordered a custom rubber stamp to imprint the faces of old postcards, some I made from paperback book covers or record jackets. Been sending these to literary journals, poets, mail artists and friends, as long as I have a snail mail address.