asemic writing

“Flip Operations II” and 5 asemic calligraphy works published in Otoliths

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The latest issue of Otoliths was released today, this one being Issue 53, the southern autumn, 2019. As usual, it’s an encyclopedic compendium of “plays, poems, paintings, reviews, stories, and collaborations galore” from across the international avant garde spectrum, including work from Lynn Strongin, Jeff Bagato, Pete Spence, Kyle Hemmings, Seth Howard, Andrew Topel,  Jim Leftwich, Steve Potter, Sanjeev Sethi, David Baptiste Chirot, Alison Ross, Mike Callaghan, John M. Bennett, Stephen Bett, Jim Meirose, Joel Chace, John Bradley, Dah, Ian Ganassi, Laura Bell, Emilio Morandi, Steve Dalachinsky, Jacob Kobina Ayiah Mensah, R. Keith, Cecelia Chapman, Keith Polette, Daniel de Culla, M. Liberto Gorgoni, Olivier Schopfer, Mary Cresswell, Jack Galmitz, Anton Yakovlev, B. J. Muirhead, Nina Živančević, Gregory Kimbrell, Cameron Lowe, Pat Nolan, Richard Kostelanetz, Daniel f. Bradley, Sheila E. Murphy, Adam Fieled, Bill Wolak, Márton Koppány, M.J. Iuppa, Gregory Stephenson, Elaine Woo, Karl Kempton, J. D. Nelson, Carol Stetser, Neil Leadbeater, Texas Fontanella, Tony Mancus & CL Bledsoe, gobscure, David Lohrey, Douglas Barbour, Keith Higginbotham, Guy R. Beining, Sarah Sarai, hiromi suzuki, Thomas Fink, Maya D. Mason, Carla Bertola, Tom Beckett, Randee Silv & Mumtazz, Mark DuCharme, Michael O’Brien, Elmedin Kadric, Keith Nunes, Bob Heman, John Kalliope, Rebecca Ruth Gould, Charles Borkhuis, Tony Beyer, Kenneth Rexroth, Maralena Howard, Stu Hatton, Michael Brandonisio, Brian Glaser, Penelope Weiss, Stephen Nelson, Tom Daley, Bernie Earley, Anna Cates, Jeff Harrison, John Levy, Vernon Frazer, Miro Sandev, Sabine Miller,  Christopher Barnes, Nick Nelson, Jimmy Rivoltella, Katrinka Moore, Joe Balaz, Marilyn Stablein, Paul Pfleuger, Jr., John Pursch, Joseph Buehler, Colleen Woods, Michael Philip Castro, Michael Prihoda, Henry Crawford, Wes Lee, & Gay Beste Reineck.

I’m very pleased to be in the bunch with one text work and five asemic calligraphy pieces.

“Flip Processor II” is actually a “short story” about two AI robots conducting business transactions in a proprietary language consisting of a limited vocabulary and specific syntax. You can check out this work here.

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One poem and five asemic works in Angry Old Man

AOM 6 coverOnline experimental lit journal Angry Old Man released Issue 6 today, with another great roster of visual, text and video work from across the spectrum of the international literary avant garde. I’m pleased to be represented by one text piece and five asemic calligraphy works. The text piece is part of a new series of experiments involving a very restricted vocabulary intended to mirror the kind of language invention of an AI transaction robot. View the text piece here, and the asemic calligraphy here.

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AOM 6 asemic

Four asemic calligraphy poems published in Utsanga

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Utsanga is an online journal for experimental writing and theory, based in Italy. The journal’s nineteenth issue, the first of 2019, was released today (March 31) with a who’s who of contributors from the international avant lit scene, including Francesco Aprile, Tim Gaze, Mark Young, Rosaire Appel, John M. Bennett, and many others. Well worth checking out. I’m very pleased to have been included this time with a selection of four pieces of asemic calligraphy. You can check them out here.

Five asemic writing pieces published at The New Post-literate

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The New Post-literate: A Gallery of Asemic Writing is a weblog exploring “asemic writing in relation to post-literate culture.” Scan its entries to find a massive catalog of imaginary scripts and pseudo-writing from around the world. Ultimately, these are scripts or images that look like writing, but have no semantic content. For me, the pieces have the same mysterious pull of looking at lost languages like Linear B, Harappan characters, or Easter Island’s rongorongo script, or even deciphered ones like Ancient Egyptian or Mayan hieroglyphs.

Today, the NP-L published five of my asemic writing pieces, which I made using a brush and India ink back in November 2017. I’m calling them “poems” but they could be prose poems, short stories, or grocery lists. Ultimately, it’s a type of visual poetry. You can check out the pieces here.

“Paradise in a Pill” and two other poems, plus five asemic letters in Angry Old Man

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Angry Old Man is one of the best online journals out there for experimental words and images. AOM issue #5 was just released, filled with great contributions from the international avant garde poetry scene. I’m pleased that several of my works are included: three text poems from my “robot language” series–“Paradise in a Pill,” “This is What We Know,” and “Your Body Is Waiting”–plus five video stills that represent part of an alien asemic alphabet. You can view the images here, and read the poems here

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The texts form part of a new series of experiments inspired by the Facebook AI units that recently developed their own language using English words with different syntax and meaning. The AI units were intended to carry out customer service transactions and negotiations, and the format of their language seems to be a powerful way to confront and manipulate the continuous stream of commercial messages invading our mental space. I’ve written more about this work here.

Each of these three pieces were initiated by phrases contained in spam emails that seemed evocative of something more mysterious or sinister…like something a robot would say when addressing an audience of meatbags.

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6 asemic poems on The New Post-Literate

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Asemic writing blog The New Post-literate posted six of my asemic poems today. These come from a large stash (85+ pieces) of this alien script, all rendered with a brush and black ink. You can check out the NPL group here.

“Asemic” writing is any text that doesn’t have a semantic value for the reader. For more examples, just browse around the images and other resources on the New Post-literate site!

Asemic alphabet video stills published in The New Post-literate

asemic-alphabet-nplThe New Post-literate is an online literary blog dedicated to the exploration of asemic writing–that is, writing that looks like writing, but that cannot be deciphered by the reader. Today, the journal published seven still images from my video Silenced Scribes that each appear to be a letter from an unknown alphabet. You can check out the portfolio here.

Make America GONCH Again

Lo Goncho

Allagon allagon noch ohan
logonallanach cholloch noch nohal
nonoll ocalch hoch alag nach
gongalla noch chaggah oggon
choll agal ancha naag logolnag
cocall calla nonalla naollo
ogollocha agonoa nogg llogah
haagah golh nachlanna noll
golh noch colaag noch allo
noch allo noch allonagga
Lo Goncho no allo
chachallanagach agan galhannach
noch gangaang alloocal

 

One of my new lines of literary inquiry, the Gonch project has several different phases. Text pieces, like the one above, are written using a vocabulary limited to words invented from the nonsense phrase “All Gonch.” It’s an attempt to create a new language, imagining also the culture behind it through the shape, sounds and structure of the words, that might arise after the death of the current (American) culture and language. The composition proceeds intuitively, going for sounds and structures that seem poetic, even if they don’t carry semantic meaning to a non-Gonch reader.