Poetry

Halloween humor: Cthulhu Limericks

Cthulhu ad-sirens call

Looking for some Halloween humor? Cthulhu Limericks is available on Amazon! This collection of 70+ rhymed verses based on H.P. Lovecraft’s Cthulhu Mythos combines horror and humor in equal measure to demonstrate that man’s view of himself as the center of a known space-time continuum remains laughably out of scale with the reality that ancient forces control his world.

Print version available here; kindle version here.

Best of Net Nomination for “Ouija Leans In”

best of net 2019

I was pleasantly surprised to hear from Midnight Lane Boutique editor Johnny Longfellow yesterday, telling me he had nominated my poem “Ouija Leans In” for the Best of the Net Anthology 2019. He announced his nominations, which included pieces by Kimo Armitage and Joan Colby, on the journal’s website here.

Even more flattering was the thoughtful analysis he wrote of my work:

Despite its seemingly supernatural underpinnings, this poem speaks directly to the difficulties of not simply communicating with others, but of sometimes even finding the words to express a complete thought. Not simply a fine example of contemporary absurdism, this poem also illustrates the utility of using the so-called “pathetic fallacy” that many less daring writers would not even think to attempt. And, it does so with both sly humor and rich imagery.

Aside from making the piece sound smarter than it actually is, this note helped me understand how other people might read and understand one of my poems. It’s been over 30 years since I read nineteenth century art critic John Ruskin in grad school, so I had to google his term “pathetic fallacy” to find out it refers to the rather lazy poetic tendency to anthropomorphize inanimate objects, particularly in the work of Wordsworth, Keats and other Romantics. The sentimentality of a “chuckling brook” or a “jolly breeze” really rubbed Ruskin the wrong way. I wonder what he would have thought about using a Ouija board as a character in a poem?

Anyway, Johnny Longfellow published “Ouija Leans In,” along with two other poems featuring Ouija, in Midnight Lane Boutique on August 3, 2018. You can read them here.

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“A Bone and It’s Dog” published in Slipstream 39

Just received my copy of Slipstream #39 in the mail yesterday. This new issue is themed “Boneyards, Junkyards and Backyards”–80 pages of poetry in an outlaw mode. Lots of great stuff, judging by the brief time I’ve flipped through it. This is a print-only magazine, so copies can be purchased direct through the journal’s website.

I’m pleased to be represented here with one poem, “A Bone and It’s Dog.”

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“Silver Tree in the Black Castle” and three other poems published in Ygdrasil

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The August 2019 issue of online literary journal Ygdrasil was released on July 10. It includes four of my poems from the Civilization’s Lost series: “The Silver Tree in the Black Castle,” “Capital Ruins,” “Early Observatory,” and “Erasing the Temple.” This series examines lost civilizations from around the world to highlight the fragility of languages, cultures and nations in the wake of the current American regime. You can read the whole issue here.

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“This Changes Everything” and two other poems plus four vispo published in Otoliths

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Otoliths 54, the Southern Winter 2019 issue, was released today, encompassing another encyclopedic cross section of the international avant garde in textual and visual works. I’m very pleased to be included with four visual poems and three new text pieces: “This Changes Everything,” “See What’s All About,” and “What We See.” You can check them out here.

The vispo are part of a small series of “tape sample” works made by pulling images from a daily newspaper using cellophane tape. The texts are part of a series inspired by the Facebook AI units that created their own language using English words with new semantic and syntactical values.

 

“Don’t Fear the Rainbow” and one other poem published in Unlikely Stories

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A great, long-running literary journal based in New Orleans, Unlikely Stories expands its online component with a monthly literary salon, book publishing, video readings and more. I’m pleased to announe two of my poems were published on the site today: “Don’t Fear the Rainbow” and “A Picnic Full of Secrets.” You can read them here.

Five visual poems published in Utsanga

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Utsanga is an online journal for experimental literary work, edited from Italy. Utsanga #20 was released recently, filled with visual and textual work from across the international avant garde. According to the Facebook announcement:

“Utsanga.it: il numero 20, giugno 2019, è online con Wellington Amancio, Mariangela Guatteri, David Chirot, Anna Serra, Ruggero Maggi, Michael Filler, Nico Vassilakis, Kristine Snodgrass, Paolo Allegrezza, Carmine Lubrano, Martina Stella, Marcus Volz, Leo Barth, David Kjellin, Stephen Nelson, Jacob Kobina Ayiah Mensah, Karla Van Vliet, Vilde Valerie Bjerke Torset, Vitaldo Conte, Volodymyr Bilyk, Francesco Aprile, Simon Costello, Sacha Archer, Richard James Biddle, Oronzo Liuzzi, Nùria Martìnez Vernis, Nancy Scott Bell, Mark Young, Louis Crane, John M. Bennett, Tom Cassidy, Jeff Bagato, Hank Lazer, Giovanni Cardone, Giorgio Moio, Giorgia Romagnoli, George Sabov, Du Ru Xie Bai, Chris Turnbull, Cecelia Chapman, Jeff Crouch, Carla Hackenschmidt, Cal Priest, József Bíró, Bill Bissett, Annie Bergson, Anna Boschi, Alexander Limarev, Neus Borrell, Pierre Bastien i Nicodemes Mendes.”

I’m pleased to be included with five pieces of visual poetry from an early tape sample series. All the pieces were made by “sampling” daily newspapers using cellophane tape. You can check out the selection here.

Two poems published in Futures Trading

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The latest issue of online literary journal Futures Trading, this one numbered 7.1, came out yesterday. It includes works from across the international avant garde, pieces from Mike Jurkovic, John N. Miller, DS Maolalai, Genelle Chaconas, Sanjeev Sethi, Christopher Barnes, Grant Jenkins, Jim Meirose, Richard Kostelanetz, Mark Halpern, Mark Blickley, Monty Jones, Natan Last, Ewa Mazierska, Liz Glodek, Jeff Bagato, Sacha Archer, and Mark Young. Check it out here.

I’m pleased to be represented by two poems: “By the Wind, By the Sea, By the Storm” and “Coming Home to Lemuria.” These are from a new-ish series based on lost civilizations from around the world, an effort to account for the fragility of languages, cultures and nations in these grim times. You can scroll down through the issue to read my work, but here’s a brief excerpt, below.

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“Best Offer” and “Quick Cash Secret” published in Avant Appal(achia)

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An online journal for experimental writing, Avant Appal(achia) just released its seventh issue today, featuring contributors from around the world. I’m pleased to be represented by two texts, “Best Offer” and “Quick Cash Secret.” Both of these are from a new series in which I’ve attempted to work with the kind of language deconstruction displayed by the two Facebook transactional AI units before they were disconnected. You can read them here.

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