publishing

Short story “Pussy War Theory” published in Gobbet magazine

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An online literary magazine for “experimental word stuffs,” Gobbet released my short story “Pussy War Theory” today. Part of a series of texts featuring the character Doom Pussy, it describes a Kali-like Earth goddess figure engaged in a constant war against the minions of a material death culture. This is the first of those pieces to be published since the 1990s.

Important note: There should probably be some kind of hazard warning on this story, due to extreme language, sexual situations, and the misuse of avant garde techniques. Needless to say, it is intended for mature audiences only.

If all this nonsense hasn’t scared you off, you can read “Pussy War Theory” here.

Supplementary note: Gobbet editor Gary J. Shipley wrote that the piece was “abject, lean and oddly precise: a winning combination.” I’m not sure what that means exactly, but the Doom Pussy stories reflect my long study of Artaud, Bataille, and Burroughs. Possibly as a reflection of the tale’s over-the-top intensity, harsh noise band Macronympha “borrowed” segments of one previously published story for titles and liner notes on a 7″ release. You can read my article about that record here.

“My Pretties” in Danse Macabre du Jour

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Online journal Danse Macabre du Jour presents dark and strange literature in a blend of obscure classics and contemporary works. Today, it published my poem “My Pretties.” This one conjures familiars to carry on ecoterrorist schemes of spreading seeds in areas dominated by civilization. You can read it here.

“Rabbit Money Tree” goes live on In Between Hangovers

rabbit-hangoversOutlaw poetry blog In Between Hangovers releases several new poems every day. Today, one of its offerings is my poem “Rabbit Money Tree.” It features a trickster rabbit character–based more on the Mayan idea of such a creature than Bugs Bunny–that I used in a few pieces. In this one, Rabbit robs a bank; he’s always getting into some antisocial mischief. You can read it here.

“All Those Zimbabwes” in Futures Trading

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The issue 5.2 of Futures Trading was released August 16. It includes my poem “All Those Zimbabwes,” part of a series based on various lost civilizations. Under the current U.S. regime, it seems important to examine the fragility of languages, cultures and nations. This one starts with the ancient kingdom of Zimbabwe, which left many cities in ruins, each of them apparently called “Zimbabwe.” You can read it here.

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“Johnson Absolutely” in Your One Phone Call

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Outlaw poetry blog Your One Phone Call published my poem “Johnson Absolutely” today. You can read it here.

This piece is another to feature Jean Savage, an antiestablishment figure who turned up in a number of poems and stories. When I compiled Savage Magic to be the “complete Jean Savage poems,” I overlooked this one somehow. That’s what happens when you have a backlog of a few hundred poems. If you like this one or some of my other pieces in “surrealist rant” mode, you might check out the book, available on Amazon and Lulu.

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“Breech Birth of Democracy” and 2 other poems in Ygdrasil

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“The first Literary Journal to be published on the Internet,” Ygdrasil started in 1994 and is still going strong. Their new September issue (Vol XXV, Issue 9, Number 293) was released a bit early. It contains three of my poems: “Breech Birth of Democracy,”
“These visions have a human reference point,” and “Out of House, Out of Home.” You can read them here.

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Poems published in Otoliths, In Between Hangovers, & Black Poppy Review

Just catching up on some publications after a trip to the Southern California desert: Joshua Tree, Slab City, Salvation Mountain, Mount San Jacinto, the Cabazon Dinosaurs, and the Palm Springs Tonga Hut.

Over the break, three different journals included my work on May 1:

A big group of multi-media material appeared in Otoliths #45, including a textual poem, a video poem, and six stills from the video. “The Earth Remains Flat” is one of the pieces I’ve been working on lately with the theme of “Civilization’s Lost.” I used a section of the text as an overlay in a video poem of the same name, and then pulled stills from the video. Some of the images dig into asemic territory. You can view it all here.

“The Haunting” appeared in Black Poppy Review. You can read it here.

“One for the Road” appeared in In Between Hangovers. You can read it here.