lost civilizations

“Frozen in Babylon” and four other poems published in BlazeVOX

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Online poetry journal BlazeVOX is known for publishing a wide variety of contemporary experimental work. Their Fall 2018 issue brings together a huge number of writers around the loose theme of “the idea of ‘public space’ and more specifically on spaces where anyone can do anything at any given moment.”

The issue includes five poems from my “Civilization’s Lost” series: “Frozen in Babylon,” “Upon the High Castle,” “No Guiding Light,” “The White Grave,” and “Schools of Drift.” The pieces in the series were inspired by lost civilizations from around the world. Under the current American regime, it seems important to examine the fragility of languages, cultures and nations. “Upon the High Castle,” for instance, is based on the cliff side city of Mesa Verde in Arizona. You can read my contributions here.

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“A Binary Run” and two other poems published in Futures Trading

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An online journal of experimental poetics, Futures Trading released its new issue today. Volume 6.1, this is a larger issue than usual because the journal has gone from a quarterly to biannual publishing schedule. Lots of writers from the international “scene” represented, as you can see in the masthead image above.

I’m pleased that three of my poems appear in this issue as well: “A Binary Run,” “Some Other Aztalan,” and “Ancient Americas.” All three come from my “Civilization’s Lost” series using lost cities and civilizations to examine the fragility of languages, cultures and nations in the wake of the current US regime. You can read those pieces and the whole issue here.

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“Joys of Doggerland and 5 other poems in Word for/Word

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Online literary journal  focuses on experimental visual and text works. The new issue #31 is out. I’m pleased to be part of this one with six poems: “Joys of Doggerland,” “Dimming of the Haruspex,” “Standing Stone,” “Electromagnetic Pulse,” “Efface the New Caesar,” and “Cold Fortress.” You can read them here.

All these pieces are based on various lost cities or civilizations around the world. This series was inspired by current US affairs, which really made me think about the fragility of languages, cultures and nations.

“Another Broken Home” published in Night Garden Journal

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Black Poppy Review recently changed its name to Night Garden Journal. Today, my poem “Another Broken Home” appeared under the new banner. You can read the whole piece here.

The story in the poem is based on a legend from Tinian Island in the Marianas archipelago, one of the ancient homes of the Chamorro people. Guam is the southernmost island of the group. The mushroom stones in the poem are actually called latte stones. The mythological king Taga built a large house on foundation of latte stones, today called the House of Taga. The story explains the origin of the foundation pillars.

While this piece is not technically a part of the “Civilization’s Lost” series I’ve been working on, it continues my interest in lost lands. Under the current US regime, it seems more important than ever to examine the fragility of languages, cultures and nations.

“All Those Zimbabwes” in Futures Trading

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The issue 5.2 of Futures Trading was released August 16. It includes my poem “All Those Zimbabwes,” part of a series based on various lost civilizations. Under the current U.S. regime, it seems important to examine the fragility of languages, cultures and nations. This one starts with the ancient kingdom of Zimbabwe, which left many cities in ruins, each of them apparently called “Zimbabwe.” You can read it here.

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“Some New Wizard at the Wheel” in Streetcake

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This morning my poem “Some New Wizard at the Wheel” went live in Streetcake magazine, Issue 53. You can read it here.

The poem is one of a series inspired by lost civilizations around the world. Under the current American regime, it seems important to examine the fragility of languages, cultures and nations.

“From Palace to Palace” and 4 other poems in Empty Mirror

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Today, Empty Mirror published five poems in my “Civilization’s Lost” series: “From Palace to Palace,” “A Better Cannibal,” “Chain of Command,” “Mound Culture,” and “To every fox, a henhouse of his own.” You can read them here.

The series as a whole is based around various lost civilizations or lost cities. “From Palace to Palace,” for instance, takes the Minoan civilization as its starting point, with images of the horns of consecration, bull leapers and a large system of palaces blending with thoughts about its still undeciphered written language, known as “Linear A.” Under the current U.S. regime, I feel it’s important to examine the fragility of languages, cultures and nations.

Empty Mirror is one of my favorite online lit mags. Many pieces revolve around Beat literature, but there’s lots of contemporary visual poetry, art, and writing. Highly recommended for a slow Friday at work!