Short story “Pussy War Theory” published in Gobbet magazine

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An online literary magazine for “experimental word stuffs,” Gobbet released my short story “Pussy War Theory” today. Part of a series of texts featuring the character Doom Pussy, it describes a Kali-like Earth goddess figure engaged in a constant war against the minions of a material death culture. This is the first of those pieces to be published since the 1990s.

Important note: There should probably be some kind of hazard warning on this story, due to extreme language, sexual situations, and the misuse of avant garde techniques. Needless to say, it is intended for mature audiences only.

If all this nonsense hasn’t scared you off, you can read “Pussy War Theory” here.

Supplementary note: Gobbet editor Gary J. Shipley wrote that the piece was “abject, lean and oddly precise: a winning combination.” I’m not sure what that means exactly, but the Doom Pussy stories reflect my long study of Artaud, Bataille, and Burroughs. Possibly as a reflection of the tale’s over-the-top intensity, harsh noise band Macronympha “borrowed” segments of one previously published story for titles and liner notes on a 7″ release. You can read my article about that record here.

“View from the Park Bench” and two other poems in Outlaw Poetry

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Outlaw Poetry magazine seems like an encyclopedia of outsider, “outlaw” poetry. Just check out the long list of writers published in the journal. Naturally, I’m very pleased to be part of it again. This time, three poems appear in the journal: “View from the Park Bench,” “Please Disregard This Alarm,” and “A Maggot for the Time.” You can read them here.

“Kidd’s Work Is Never Done” published by In Between Hangovers

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Underground poetry blog In Between Hangovers has a batch of my poems they are trickling out into the world a little faster than I expected. The latest installment, “Kidd’s Work Is Never Done” made it to the blogosphere today.  18th century privateer William Kidd makes an appearance in this one. Another highlight is the new photo! You can check it out here.

Flashback: DC Poetry Slam and Reading at 15 Minutes Club

The 90’s called. They want their poetry slam poster back!

I found two copies of this double-sided flier in a folder of old literary correspondence. I used to regularly attend the open mic readings at 15 Minutes Club, on 15th Street in DC, run by Art Schuhart (editor of GYST journal). I developed my “surreal rant” style work to present there, reading those pieces as loud and fast as possible.

Poetry slams were a big thing in the 90s, like the grunge rock of poetry. I can’t remember if I ever participated in a slam, though. Schuhart also ran the slam team, and once asked if I wanted to join. But in my opinion, poetry is not a competition. Besides, the people who won always seemed to rap, talk about their sex lives, or tell jokes. I don’t mind any of that stuff, but my own writing never seems to come out that way.

The “reading” side may spark some interest for featuring punk poet Jim Carroll on Sept 7 (exact year unknown). DC poetry geezers may remember Dean Blehert and Miles David Moore, two prominent local writers in what you might call the “Federal School”: bureaucrats turned poets. Reston, VA-based Blehert issued a monthly newsletter promoting his own work (and lots of puns), while Moore hosted a long-running reading at Arlington’s Iota Club.

Video stills in Angry Old Man Magazine

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New online poetry magazine Angry Old Man just released its first issue today using one of my video stills as cover art. It also includes four other samples of my visual poetry. AOM #1 is a large issue encompassing textual and visual experiments to expand the notion of writing and written messages. You can check it out here.

Visual poem published in H&

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H& is “an occasional journal of visual/concrete poetry and assorted other oddities.” Today, the vispo blog published another of the video stills from “Succubus Highway.” Although the text is distorted from the heavy video processing, the original reads “Wherever there are ruins/lies like flames/dance across time.” Full image available here.

Turntable ensemble STYLUS at Sonic Circuits 2017 this Sunday, 9/17

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It’s time again for the annual Sonic Circuits, DC’s festival for experimental, improvised, and outside musics, held this year at Rhizome from Sept 15-17. That’s three nights of local, national, and international freak jams. Turntable ensemble Stylus will be performing a new work by band leader Jim Adams on Sunday, Sept 17. As one of the turntablists, I’ll be appearing with the group. The ensemble will be expanded with a guitar section and feature visual projections. If you’re into “difficult” music, don’t miss this!

This official word about the group (from the festival website) will describe it better than I could: “STYLUS is a Washington DC-based turntable ensemble that performs with multiple vintage classroom turntables as their instruments, using locked-groove + prepared vinyl to create a sound that is minimalist, pulse-like + hypnotic yet also dynamic + punctuated. STYLUS performers to date include mainstays of the Washington, D.C. avant-garde, free improvisation, modern composition, noise, + electronic music scene….STYLUS performers for the 2017 SCDC Festival are JS Adams, Jeff Bagato, Chester Hawkins, Janel Leppin, Ryan Martini, Gary Rouzer, Keith Sinzinger, Stéphane Récrosio, vinyl, Jeff Barsky, guitar, John Howard, guitar, Guillermo Pizarro, digital, Mei Mei Chang, visuals.”

“STYLUS will perform “(AT to ER) Apt to Err_Who am the Only One,” a new composition in collaboration with French lo-fi guitarist, Stéphane Récrosio (astatine / acetate z e r o), utilizing commissioned, limited-edition lathe acetates. The performance will include live infrared-video work from Mei Mei Chang and be dedicated to former STYLUS performer, Andrew McCarry (1984 – 2016) . STYLUS warmly embraces the modern compositional elements of turntablism + the contemporary sound-art of Christian Marclay + Philip Jeck. Other influences include such historic constructs as the Futurist manifesto L’arte dei Rumori, Dadaism, Automatism + Russian Constructivism along with Louis Braille, Samuel F.B. Morse, Milan Knížák’s Broken Music, the graphic scores of Cornelius Cardew + Fluxus performance, plus the prepared instrumentation + happenstance of John Cage.”